Search for light and dark

 
 Sometimes having to work with materials you don’t like can help make you do something different. In this case, it was having a set of moleskine books with paper that is too thin for watercolour or ink or micron pen. Why I bought that type of paper, I do not know.

In a ‘do not waste paper’ mood, I decided to try my not very well used coloured pencils. I was pleasantly surprised by how well they glide over smooth paper. I also tried holding the pencils so that they were on their sides rather than their points. This awkwardness made me scribble and unable to ‘draw everything’. It also somehow got me looking more and finding what was dark, what was light and what was interesting.

Working from the side of the pencil also helps create longer and sharper points which came in handy for reinforcing darker spots. I liked that bit. 

In  20 minutes I’ve now have a use for this type of paper.

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7 thoughts on “Search for light and dark

  1. Love your experimentation. Reviewing the paper stash is also a great idea. I’ve been looking for square format watercolour journals, I have old ones just about used up and they are now scarce as hen’s teeth. So we are getting off our collective backsides and making our own using that big roll of watercolour paper from the corner of the back room. Duh!

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    1. Good idea re. paper. I’ve been thinking about gesso-ing over all my used watercolour paper just in attempt to reuse rather than buying more stuff – a habit hard to break 🙂 In this, I find Ian Fairweather inspiring.

      Its this kind of conversation that makes blogging worthwhile – thank you!

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      1. Oh Fairweather I am addicted to his work. I love the story of how he took the canvas sent to mend his tent on Bribie island and painted it instead. Of course he would. I always stop by his paintings in the National Gallery for a quick deep breath of beauty.

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      2. Fairweather had such a tough and true-to-himself type character. BTW I’ve started gesso-ing over top of a watercolour drawing. Looks messy and non-descript. I’ll have to break through the ‘don’t what to do next’ point I often get.

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