Book of little treasures

Came across a little concertina book tucked away in my bookshelf. From memory, I enjoyed doing these and especially where I get to the part of the drawing when the structure has been worked out and the tones just start to ‘pop out’ through darkening and also erasing.

It has been a while since I have done this kind of drawing – slow, intense looking and direct copying from nature.      

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Backgrounds. What to do with those? (2)

  
While this piece was not inspired by Johannes Vermeer, his works did cross my mind as I struggled with what to do with the background. His interiors are wonderful for the way they are integrated with any people. They just belong there. Not plonked there. There is a story that can be created. Light streams from his windows. 

Here, Chloe is talking to a bird – one I bought from an art gallery bookshelf – and wanting to make sure it was comfortable. It had fallen off its perch and had been hanging upside down for some time, gathering dust. 

Catching children engrossed in an imaginary world is a real joy.

Backgrounds. What to do with those? (1)

  
I’m still enjoying using this lolly coloured watercolour set. Not sure what to say about this piece except that I wanted to work out how to break up a background. Not sure about you, but I often get stumped with the background. 

Often I leave it white; other times I make a mess. 

This background is a’collage’ of aspects of my loungeroom. And yes, there is quite a bit of yellow.

Pushing through

  
A thing I have learnt from swimming every morning for the last ten years or so, is pushing through that feeling of ‘I don’t feel like it.’ This happens especially on cold and windy days. The reverse is now the case. If I don’t go for a swim, my body ‘complains’ and says ‘see I told you so, you should have gone. You’d be feeling much more refreshed.’ 

Nothing more annoying than a wingeing inner voice. To avoid that, I swim.

Drawing can be like that some mornings. Some days when I feel rather uninspired with drawing, I do something like this. Grab a pen, book and draw something in front of me. More often than not, a focus takes over and very soon a drawing of sorts appears. I think it helps to just keep the excuses at bay by using whatever is on hand.

The wonky vessel on the right, by the way, is a light fitting I found in an op shop for $4. I suspected there was a missing ceiling attachment thing but thought in a worse case scenario, it will work as a ‘vase’. And it does. Well…it doesn’t leak.

Here and out there in Murwillumbah

 Have you ever visited Murwillumbah? No? It’s a small town in the far north of New South Wales – gorgeously lush and with the Tweed River flowing through it. 

When you stay with friends and they are busy in the morning doing this and that, it is a great time to sit and admire and remember the view with a sketch. This is from their back porch.

This is what I wanted to remember:

– The size of the magnolias remind me of the warmth and generosity of heart I felt through the conversations with various people I met over the weekend.

– The wire gate, fence, timber parts gathered from here and there reused creatively to make spaces for guinea pigs and chickens.

– And out there, in the wider landscape there are cane fields and mountain backdrops. 

Thank you Leah, Neroli, Ena, Reuben and all your delightful friends.

A scholar, an elephant and a succulent

Still lives – a scholar, probably Confucious, an elephant from India and a succulent from a suburban gardener originally from Iran – threads I cannot quite connect to create a story. Not yet, anyway.
So here it remains, a little picture put together from moving objects around on a garden table. A gentle start into a new year. 
I have been meaning to thank you – dear blogger – for the many little blog exchanges and the wonderful artwork shared through your posts. It makeas for a richer blogging experience. 
Thank you and I hope for you, much creativity and happiness throughout 2016.

Fiddling about

   
Can’t get enough of this fiddle leaf plant! It’s all the positive and negative spaces and shapes that I love. Turn is slightly and you get another configuration to draw.

It is a lovely feel in the air at present – warm breezes, quieter roads and relaxed routines – holiday season has begun. Love it. 

To make and to review (2)

Still making more little stationary sets. Not perfect nor extravagant as gifts. Just handmade.

In looking for ideas I am going through sketchbooks. But I find that it is somehow easier to make designs up by looking out onto the balcony for ideas. Do you find that too – that observation gives so much more variety or scope for inspiration?

What to draw is one exercise. The other is choosing which colours to use. As I am enjoying the convenience of this kids palette with its range of 36 sorbet-like colours, working out colour combinations is another exercise.

All good fun.
  

To make and to review (1)

Not much blogging, but still drawing – little drawings to make a few simple stationary sets as little gifts.

When rummaging around for ideas, I’m going through sketchbooks – quite a few by now. 

It’s kind of a way of reviewing what I have been doing. Needless to say, there are a lot of balcony plant sketches. Some plants have since drooped, gone and new ones added – an inadvertant record of balcony life!
  
 

Drawing. A way to travel.

  

Listening to Nuran Zorlu (ABC Spirit of things podcast: 53 mins) talk about his photography of Persia’s world heritage sites, has inspired me to ‘travel’ to Isfahan, Iran, a place I have not been to and may not be able to for some time. 
A quick Pinterest search is all you need to appreciate the richly detailed beauty of the architecture and the layers of history and meaning embedded in the designs. Humans are capable of creating so much that is wonderful and yet…

If I were to put together an itinerary, it would have to include:

  • The Music Room on the sixth floor of the Ali Quapu Palace
  • Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque
  • Imam (Shah) Mosque
  • Vank Church.

Sigh. If only this were easily possible.

So, for now ‘exploring through drawing’ is one way of getting there.